Tag: visual

SAMR: Free Image

SAMR is a very popular model for transforming technology use within education. We are starting to use it at school, but struggled to find a good, free version of the diagram that explains it. So, we made our own, which is shared below for use under a Creative Commons BY-SA-NC license. SAMR

Printable Version (PDF)


Visual Compare & Contrast

Personally I really like asking students to observe two artifacts or phenomena, and ask them to compare and contrast what they have encountered. I have found that students usually come up with excellent observations, and that these can be used to prompt further discussion and to encourage deeper, more critical thinking. This is especially true when the observations are visual in nature, such as a videos, physical artifacts and real-life events. I recently did this with my Year 8 pastoral group, using 15 minutes to watch and discuss the following two videos: I find these two videos fascinating on their own, but together they let the students cogitate on and discuss some of the following ideas:
  • Times have changed - look at the advancement in materials, tools, techniques, and compare the resulting products: what a different 70 years can make. It seems white work overalls are here to stay though.
  • Media has changed - the way we tell stories has become more sophisticated and much more subtle. Less use of voice, and more use of imagery, implying a more sophisticated/educated audience capable of making their own deductions.
  • Technology obsessions - the two videos show how much technology amazes us, and how we marvel at pushing boundaries and creating new things. Both focus on technologically-empowered people ("wizards") at work, as these are people that are held in high esteem.
  • The cutting edge - what seems advanced and sophisticated at one point in time (e.g. the planes and music in the first video) soon becomes outdated and comical to some degree. The same will happen to the second video over time, even if that seems unlikely to contemporary viewers.
  • Non-metal - both videos celebrate the use of non-metal materials, which flies in the face of what we see every day in terms of how most cars, planes, trains and boats and constructed.
  • Purpose - media is made for different purposes: in the first case it is as propaganda to boost moral and promote unity, in the second it is to further brand image and as artistic/creative expression.
There are a myriad other ways to look at these two clips, but this article is limited to a narrow point of view: can any readers suggest alternative perspectives or ideas?

Dingbat Puzzles – Resources – TES Connect

http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6015473&firstLoginPage=Y

Pupils love these and a great way to promote lateral thinking. Each square contains a word or phrase with visual clues as to what it is. The number of letters in each word of the phrase is contained underneath.…

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Engrish

http://engrish.com/

Students can gain a new appreciation of the difficulties inherent in learning English, by studying Engrish’s real-world, visual examples of English gone wrong. Whilst this site is mostly intended to entertain, it can be used to provide stimulus materials which help to engage students …

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