Tag: media

Remix

LigerAfter posting a piece on remixes I use with students, I received some interest in the unit that the remixes are used in. So, here is that unit. It focuses on developing student skills and knowledge in terms of copyright and Creative Commons (a …

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Remix Examples

Remix is one of my favourite contemporary art forms, and something that all of my students study. What could be better than making something new out of someone elses media creations? If you get into remix enough, you even find yourself starting to agree with Kirby Ferguson's assertion that Everything Is A Remix. Today I was updating my remix playlist, which I show students at the start of year. I thought I would share some of my favourites. Please feel free to add suggestions in the comments section: If you are interested in the legal side of remix, you might want to watch Copyleft: A Teacher’s Guide To Sharing (of course, remixing with Creative Commons is the best way to go, but sometimes fair use has to be invoked if we want to critique companies and governments.

Ultra-Cheap Flying Camera

A few of my Year 9s had been away, missing the first lesson of a two-part assignment in which students had to film a creative shot of some kind. Trying to think of how to get these students engaged and up to speed, I came up with the idea of trying to set up a flying camera, which, launched from the first floor, would fly down a cable, filming the action on the playground below. The students quickly got into the idea, and I called in another teacher (thanks Ben!) to help keep the kids safe whilst I worked with the other groups. There was some creative thinking, problem solving, a few test runs and some iteration in the design. In the end, we launched from the 3rd floor, and got the following shot. The kids stayed into break (thanks Harry, George, Alex & Damien), and we ended up with a crowd of curious students trying to work out what we were doing. Best of all, the final shot was produced using only materials we found around school. So, here it is, our Ultra-Cheap Flying Camera shot:

ICHK Zombiefest

TrolleyMy Year 9 ICT & Media students are currently learning some of the foundational skills that will help them make movies towards the end of term. Having looked at narrative structure, we have now moved on to creative shooting techniques. Originally, each class (I teach all three groups in a row on a Thursday) was going to create a simple low rolling shot using a delivery trolley instead of a professional dolly. The aim was for students to use ingenuity to overcome a lack of expensive, professional equipment. The first class decided to do a hallway scene showing typical break time behaviour. At some point a student suggested we do it zombie style, and all of a sudden we had a trailer on our hands. I then asked the following two classes to come up with their own version of the trailer for the same film (now called ICHK Zombiefest in honour of our school). Students took on different roles in the shooting, and the aim was for every student to contribute. Decisions were collaborative, and guided by the director (sometimes me, sometimes a student). The video below is the end result of the three lessons' work. This was one of those magical days in teaching, where it was a lot fun, but totally draining. Well done to all of the students, especially to those who really jumped on board, got excited and had a lot of fun. Thanks also to Ms. Long for leaving her paperwork to play the role of "Zombie Teacher".

Self Assessment Guide

Last year I completed my Unified ICT Rubric for KS3, and even before it was finished I hated it. It was too big, too complex and too restrictive. I have spent the last year slowly thinking of a better way, looking around at what others are doing, and trying to roll disparate ideas into something simple, cohesive and, gasp, even fun. The result is the document and process you see below. It is a system of student self assessment, where the teacher is there to verifying and adjudicate student's own assessments of themselves. But, it is more than simply an assessment guide, it is also a way for students to understand a whole course, and to map their progress.

ICT & Media Assessment Guide_web

Large version (PNG) | A3 printable version (PDF) | Editable student version w/ log (Pages)

The Teaching & Assessment Process

This document can be used in numerous ways to support teaching and learning. The description below is the way I am currently planning to use it:
  • The first step has been to reduce the number of units in each year, to free up 5 lessons for students to work on self assessment. You can see my draft KS3 ICT & Media Plan, to look at what exactly is covered.
  • Students will be introduced to the guide during the first lesson of the year, and we will work through the instructions (top right of the guide) together.
  • For each unit of study, students will reflect on roughly 5 strand+keyword pairs (e.g. Intellectual Property+Creative Commons). At first, I will select these for them, after some practice they should be able to select them themselves.
  • Students will study as per usual, creating an artifact which they will submit for assessment.
  • Students will then write their reflection, showing clearly how they have achieved each level, going as high as they can. They will assign themselves a grade using the average of their layers. This reflection, plus grade, will be submitted as well.
  • Using both the submitted work, as well as the reflection, I will vet their self assessment, and determine whether it is accurate. Any adjustments (up or down), will be made before the final grade is recorded.
  • Finally, students will highlight the keywords they have reflected on, using the header colour from the highest level they have achieved. As students progress through the course, they should end up with an ongoing map of their achievement:

ICT & Media Assessment Guide_highlights

I would love to get some input on this idea. How does it compare with your own assessments? Do you think it will work? Is it suitable to subjects other than ICT & Media? Acknowledgements: this work has not been created in isolation, but rather has been influenced by many other teachers and their approaches to assessment and education in general. I would like to acknowledge Jennifer Goldthorpe's work on self assessment, Mark Roper & Kevin Lester's IEA work on a clear lexis for assessment and Chris Leach for tipping me over the edge.

Where In Hong Kong?

Where in HK - 2. Capture 3It is amazing how one thing leads to another, and all of a sudden you have a crazy idea for a unit of work on your hands. I have recently been watching some video of old Hong Kong, and chatting about the footage with …

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Alan Levine in Hong Kong

I am very happy to be organising a CPD session with Alan Levine, renowned technologist (http://www.nmc.org/horizon-project) and digital storyteller. Teachers and students are welcome. Details of the event are below. Please email me (ross@rossparker.org) to register. Alan Levine

Visual Compare & Contrast

Personally I really like asking students to observe two artifacts or phenomena, and ask them to compare and contrast what they have encountered. I have found that students usually come up with excellent observations, and that these can be used to prompt further discussion and to encourage deeper, more critical thinking. This is especially true when the observations are visual in nature, such as a videos, physical artifacts and real-life events. I recently did this with my Year 8 pastoral group, using 15 minutes to watch and discuss the following two videos: I find these two videos fascinating on their own, but together they let the students cogitate on and discuss some of the following ideas:
  • Times have changed - look at the advancement in materials, tools, techniques, and compare the resulting products: what a different 70 years can make. It seems white work overalls are here to stay though.
  • Media has changed - the way we tell stories has become more sophisticated and much more subtle. Less use of voice, and more use of imagery, implying a more sophisticated/educated audience capable of making their own deductions.
  • Technology obsessions - the two videos show how much technology amazes us, and how we marvel at pushing boundaries and creating new things. Both focus on technologically-empowered people ("wizards") at work, as these are people that are held in high esteem.
  • The cutting edge - what seems advanced and sophisticated at one point in time (e.g. the planes and music in the first video) soon becomes outdated and comical to some degree. The same will happen to the second video over time, even if that seems unlikely to contemporary viewers.
  • Non-metal - both videos celebrate the use of non-metal materials, which flies in the face of what we see every day in terms of how most cars, planes, trains and boats and constructed.
  • Purpose - media is made for different purposes: in the first case it is as propaganda to boost moral and promote unity, in the second it is to further brand image and as artistic/creative expression.
There are a myriad other ways to look at these two clips, but this article is limited to a narrow point of view: can any readers suggest alternative perspectives or ideas?

Me vs Me

I am planning projects for the year to come, and as part of a unit on Digital Citizenship I am trying to get students to think about the way they project (or create identities) for themselves. I will be asking them to compare their identity within their own family to their identity online. This is what I call "Me vs Me" (a nod to the old Mad comic "Spy vs Spy"), and students will be asked to create a visual representation of these two facets of themselves. To make it clear what I mean I put together the following example work...I hope no one takes it seriously:

Thanks to Bbpics on Wikimedia Commons for the image of the model.


Stop Joseph Kony

Joseph Kony, head of Uganda's LRA (Lord's Resistance Army), is responsible for the abduction, sexual enslavement, multilation and militarisation of thousands of African children. Although he has been indicted by the International Criminal Court, he remains essentially invisible to the world's media, governments and armed forces. Kony2012 is a massive online and real-world campaign to push for the capture and prosecution of Joseph Kony this year. Watch this video, share it, and take action. My current thinking is to bring this to my students in the hope that they will be inspired to take action.

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